Flags of the LGBTIQ Community

A short while back, we posted a compilation of the different flags of the LGBTIQ community on our Instagram account. We asked our followers to guess what each flag represents. Here, we’ll reveal the answers, and share some of the history and symbolism behind each flag. Of course, there are many more pride flags than our post includes, and many people take various positions about whether a flag properly represents their community or identity. We don't mean to prioritize any one flag or the need for a flag—rather, we wish to demonstrate the variety of identities within the LGBTIQ community, and the many ways people display their pride.

  1. Trans Pride Flag — Monica Helms, an openly transgender American woman, created the flag in 1999. The light blue and light pink are the traditional colors for baby girls and baby boys, respectively, while the white represents intersex, transitioning, or a neutral or undefined gender. According to Helms, the flag is symmetrical so “no matter which way you fly it, it is always correct, signifying us fnding correctness in our lives.”

  2. Intersex Pride Flag — Created in July 2013 by OII Australia, the intersex pride flag utilizes yellow and purple, which are considered “hermaphrodite” colors, according to the organization. The purple central circle is “unbroken and unornamented, symbolising wholeness and completeness, and our potentialities.”

  3. Genderqueer Pride Flag — This flag was designed in 2011 by Marilyn Roxie, a genderqueer writer and advocate, and features a lavender, white, and chartreuse stripe. According to Roxie, the lavender stripe is a mix of blue and pink—colors traditionally associated with men and women—and represents androgyny as well as queer identities. The white stripe, like in the transgender pride flag, represent agender or gender neutral identities. The chartreuse stripe is the inverse of lavender and represents third gender identities and identities outside the gender binary.

  4. Nonbinary Pride Flag — Kye Rowan created the nonbinary pride flag, which has yellow, white, purple, and black horizontal stripes, in 2014. It is intended to represent nonbinary people who did not feel that the genderqueer flag represents them and be used alongside Roxie’s design. The yellow stripe represents people whose gender exists outside of the binary, the white stripe, people with many or all genders, the purple, people with genders considered a mix of male and female, and the black people who identify as not having a gender.

  5. Pansexual Pride Flag — The pansexual pride flag has three horizontal stripes: pink, yellow, and blue. According to most definitions, the pink represents people who are female identified, the blue represents people who are male identified, while the yellow represents nonbinary attraction.

  6. Genderfluid Pride Flag — JJ Poole created this flag in 2012. It has five horizontal stripes: pink for femininity, blue for masculinity, purple for both masculinity and femininity, black for the lack of gender, and white for all genders.

  7. Bisexual Pride Flag — Created in 1998 by Michael Page, the bisexual pride flag has a is pink on the top and royal blue on the bottom, with an overlapping purple stripe in the middle. The pink is intended to represent attraction to the same sex only, the royal blue to the opposite sex only, and the purple attraction to both sexes or bisexuality.

  8. Agender Pride Flag — The agender pride flag, created by Salem X in 2014, has seven horizontal stripes. The black and white stripes represent an absence of gender, the gray represents semi-genderlessness, and the central green stripe represents nonbinary genders.

  9. Gay Pride Flag — Gilbert Baker created the gay pride flag in 1978, and it originally had eight stripes. The colors in order, were hot pink to represent sex, red for healing, yellow for sun, green for serenity with nature, turquoise for art, indigo for harmony, and violet for spirit. In the years since, the flag has been reduced to six colors: the flag no longer uses hot pink, and the turquoise and indigo have been replaced with royal blue.